Using Acronyms to Be a More Effective Teacher

Teachers can increase the productivity of teaching degrees by following an acronym. I’ve used acronyms a lot in my career to become an effective teacher. My “MAP” strategy below is an example of one.

Teachers can increase the productivity of teaching degrees by following an acronym. I’ve used acronyms a lot in my career to become an effective teacher. My “MAP” strategy below is an example of one.

Monitor – The M in MAP stands for the time you analyze and place students.  This can be through standardized test scores or results of local assessments.  Once you see where you kids need to be and then learn they aren’t there, you can better move on to sections A, and P.  Monitor can cover a whole slough of things teachers do when analyzing data for better instruction.

Assemble – Now don’t get that confused with assessment.  This is not that at all.  This is the step where you gather the curriculum you have to address the needs you discovered in “monitoring.”  If you’ve been a teacher the last 10 years you will agree with me that teaching is changing to less of a “district hands down the holy grail to teach with” and more to a “go through the smorgasbord and take the stuff you need” kind of approach.  The “A” represents that time to assemble the tools you need to address the need. One may be beginning to see the teaching degree requirements aren’t everything teachers need?

Prepare – The reason I created this method was for P.  My copier went out again and I had to time to get what I needed for the next day.  Later I went to the copy machine and realized I had no idea what to copy for the next day!  I created the 3 items in this acronym to keep myself aware of my students’ needs, the materials I have, and to be prepared.  The “P” is the copying, the getting it all together.

Time passes quickly in ones career. I recall when the online teaching degree came on the scene. Now, it is as common as a traditional one. If you follow the M.A.P. strategy as a teacher (or another professional) you can be a trendsetter. Of course, you may come up with a better one. Please leave your ideas in the comments to help us all be better teachers.

Author: Damien Riley

Having been a public school teacher since 1997, I've gained valuable classroom experience. Sometimes a great tool is a dynamite lesson plan. These posts are from a real teaching journey. I hope they inspire you. Thanks for reading!

1 thought on “Using Acronyms to Be a More Effective Teacher”

  1. I think preparation is the key (and for me Monitoring and Assembling is part of my preparation). I also think it is important to do this a few days in advance and not the day before. You also have to prepare for disasters such as: the copy machine is broken and may not be fixed within the next day; the material you thought you had can not be found; or you might get sick and have to have this stuff ready for a substitute.

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