A Teaching Career in This Economy- Does it Still Make Sense?

Teaching may not have the security it used to but it still cries out for serious and talented people wanting to make a difference. It will never disappear as a career in society. The real question is, do you want to do it?

This article I wrote was first published as A Teaching Career: Safe in this Economy? on Blogcritics. It has been updated and republished here to reflect current trends in education.

Picking the right major is crucial for young people in college. Should it be teaching anymore?

With economic woes at the forefront, young people choosing a career have their work cut out for them. A job like teaching, which once seemed to this Gen-Xer to be a solid choice, is now in question because of budget cuts. Not only could it prove difficult to keep a teaching job in the future, but even more likely, the pay could deteriorate below survival amounts. How can a government pay its teachers when it can’t even keep its books straight? The upside of this may be that only those who love teaching and feel “called” to it will apply. That, of course, would benefit the students of America. One sign that teachers are in her high demand is the number of teaching jobs in Florida. Whatever the hue and cry sounds like, we always need good teachers.

Though people sometimes pontificate doom and gloom, maybe they are wrong. Maybe teachers will retain the relatively decent position they have now on the food chain. Maybe a teaching certificate will earn a medium income with the security of a contract year after difficult year. While some of my friends after high school sought business degrees and big salaries, I chose to follow teacher certification programs. I have seen some of my friends crash and burn in their quest for the almighty dollar, and I have seen others flourish beyond what I ever believed possible. As for me, I am happy I went to teacher college, but some months are harder than others at just making ends meet.

Like most of you, I’ve been very concerned about the bailout crisis in American politics. I know we have a deficit in the trillions, and now Bush and others say we must write a $700 billion check from the future to the failed banks. Scary. I can’t help but wonder what will happen to teaching as a career. Our salaries come out of that empty pot from which they are pulling the $700 billion. But isn’t teaching a need of society? Won’t our government make sure that the children have the teachers they need and that the teachers are taken care of? One would hope. A teaching career is not as secure as it once was, but don’t give up if you enjoy teaching kids.

Education is as fundamental to a society as is water. I hope that as we travel into the future the government never loses sight of that. To all the potential teachers out there weighing their options, I implore you to search your heart as to what you want to study. If teaching is your choice, I don’t think you will have to worry about money as much as you would in some other careers. But that really shouldn’t matter. I know some teachers doing it “for the money,” and frankly, they are unhappy. They should look for alternatives to teaching. Education degrees cost just as much in some cases as business degrees. I don’t think any amount of money or economic stability could ever be enough when you are in the wrong occupation. Along the same lines, if you follow your passion in any career, I have confidence your working life will weather the economic storms.

We can’t control the government. We can only control our day-to-day choices. I have a feeling based on Arne Duncan and even Obama’s public words about frustration with teaching that ours will be a hot topic in culture for ten to twenty years. That is when we just need to focus on what we do and do it the best we can. We need to look at our human product (students) for our motivation and not politicians or a paycheck. If that sounds doable to you, go for teaching as a college path! Welcome aboard.

Author: Damien Riley

Having been a public school teacher since 1997, I've gained valuable classroom experience. Sometimes a great tool is a dynamite lesson plan. These posts are from a real teaching journey. I hope they inspire you. Thanks for reading!

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