Create Your Own Sport – A Small Groups Classroom Project

Getting kids to work in small groups is important to their future success as grownups. This can be done in a general ed or physical science classroom. Kids need to interact and problem solve sometimes apart from instruction and guided practice. This both assesses and develops high leveled thinking. Of course you need to be there are the “rudder” steering each small group ship toward the shore. I chose to do a small group project with my kids this week called “create your own sport.” It is mostly derived from Wikihow’s article you can find here. Below is an excerpt from that article that I recommend using for creating constructive exchange in the groups:

1
Decide what kind of sport you want. Is it racketplayed in water? On a field? Is it about accuracy or about speed? Is it an individual sport or a team sport? All these things are key when it comes to making your sport.
2
Pick a name for your sport. It shouldn’t be complicated like “Hombidilakinshire Romp,” but it shouldn’t be lame, either, like “Throwball.”
3
Make a design of the field it’ll be played in. If it doesn’t really matter where it’s played, then make sketches of the things that are needed, such as in soccer, all you need are two goals.
4
Come up with basic rules: how many players, objective, how to score/gain points, what the main methods/steps are etc. Be sure all the players have specific jobs, and that each one contributes to the game. Don’t make pointless rules, like ‘No throwing the ball at another player’s face.’ Make it more broad, such as ‘No physical violence,’ and include that under the title rule.
5
Draw the ball/racket/uniforms needed to play your sport. Sports involving balls must have a specific design for the ball. Some sports need specific uniforms. Some have a specific shape of a racket. Be creative in thinking these up!
6
Show the sport to someone else so they can proofread the rules and such, and give you advice to improve or help you with it.
7
Get your sport known: Introduce it to sporting arenas or gyms and find people who would be interested in playing.(If you attend a public school, e-mail other schools to see if they would be interested in including it in extra-curricular activities.)
8
Research. Try online teaching resources. You never know if there is a sport in another country just like the one you’re creating. Make sure its original! If you see something similar out there, add a few tweaks to your own sport to make it different. It can be similar, but don’t make it too much so.

Using these steps and questions as a backbone, I create a lesson suited to the needs and restrictions of my students. Do you have any comments regarding this lesson idea? If you’d like me to publish my detailed plans I made for my class just ask in the comments. For me, the above was more than enough to create my lesson. As with any lesson, it can be easily modified based on significant particular classroom and/or student needs. A teaching degree enables you to make fun decisions like this every teaching day.

Author: Damien Riley

Having been a public school teacher since 1997, I've gained valuable classroom experience. Sometimes a great tool is a dynamite lesson plan. These posts are from a real teaching journey. I hope they inspire you. Thanks for reading!

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