What I Want for Public Education (as a Parent & Teacher)

14585284216_10c6f5ccb5I should post a disclaimer that I am a parent of 3 public school aged children who is also a teacher at a public school. Ok, now that I am somewhat introduced … here are my points: As a parent I want these things from the public education system:

  1. Programs that foster self-esteem and self-love – I want my kids to believe in themselves and to learn how to nurture their own self esteem. Since peace with ones self does so much for our lives, including repairing cells, this is a non-negotiable for a growing child. Without this, children will have a host of problems greater than any lack of academics. Of course this starts at home.
  2. Academic instruction, based on grade level standards – In my state, this will be the Common Core standards starting next year. This is something I see the public school system fearing and putting at the highest emphasis. I think it is indeed valuable and in some ways a non-negotiable.
  3. Mutual respect and social mores review/training

PBIS is aiming at this. I think more money should be poured into this and self esteem training than academics. Because our country is so barraged with stories of hate and self loathing, like the recent shootings, it is a “no brainer” this area should be our top priority. I want my kids to know how to behave and how to live with others peacefully. Again and of course, this starts at home.

  1. Music and art appreciation – Without music, life would have been a mistake.
  2. Health and stress management training – (put your “humor me” hat on) If life expectancy is 70, health ignorance will make it 55. If the same with stress is true, 40. I want my child to live the most full robust life possible.

We as teachers are often given a schedule and curriculum that lacks the above. As a parent, I would like to see more emphasis put on nurturing the child while teaching the standards. I think we focus too much on getting the child to perform and not enough on helping the child be healthy and happy in mind and body. Parents and teachers are invited to make a comment below as to what you would like to see in public education, and/or what you think should stay that is already there.

What Does it Take to be a Teacher?

My School DeskBeing a teacher, we often get mixed reviews in our cultures. Sometimes, we are seen as “world changers” and other times not as highly. I think a lot of people think they know because everyone has had an experience with teachers. This brings up the question: What does it take to be a teacher? Let me give you a few of my observations:

Teachers are people who use their education.

Some of my friends I run across did not put their excellent education to work. Others did and went into various trades but in most cases, teachers used it to keep getting educated. All teachers have at least a Bachelor’s degree. At this point in time, most districts require an advanced degree or they won’t consider hiring you. Continue reading What Does it Take to be a Teacher?

Maybe Kids Just Have to Grow Into Serious

Seriously-face-meme-all-funnyWhen its time to get serious, we usually do it. We people I mean. Kids are not the same. They like simple and silly play. Once in a while you’ll come across a kd who is too serious but I say even those are doing so attempt to be in some simple and silly identity they’ve dreamed up. The fact is, when we start paying bills and having kids, we can’t be all giggly all the time. The rubber meets the road in those years and failing to be serious can be a mortal catastrophy. You might say we spend all of childhood avoiding being serious and all our adulthood trying to get back to the simple sillies of childhood. I don’t think you can ever go back completely. Continue reading Maybe Kids Just Have to Grow Into Serious

My Comments on a So-Called “Teacher Bill of Rights”

On Facebook this evening, I found this “teacher’s bill of rights.” This comment may sound rude but I hate blue-sky, irrational posts like this that complain on behalf of us teachers in the trenches. I would like this if it were meant as humor but I think they are being serious.
1891061_10152303771788708_1428955988_nI don’t need them to plead my case as a teacher. Here are my corresponding comments: #1 Is subjective. #2 Is subjective #3 Copy paper, pencils, and soap are provided (though I could use more pencils than 30 a month) #4 My school has fairly advanced technology #5 ok #6 Ridiculous. Highly subjective statement and completely impossible to grant to any teacher.#7 WTH are they talking about here? Colleagues evaluating us? Hopefully not some I know #8) Ha. Go into the business world. Teaching will always be a medium paid job, which is not bad. There is more security in teaching than most jobs of the same pay. #9) A dream, but a good one. #10) We get this already.

I agree with the direction of these rights but the way they aim to get there is bordering on absurd. “Think Big” they say out there in the world. I say, be the change you want to see. Little by little, you’ll affect big changes.

What to Focus on After the CST

3IsAfter the CST in most districts there are still around 30 days or so of instruction. When so much of the emphasis is on test prep and standards based instruction, then comes the question to ALL teachers after the standards test: “What now.” There are many things to teach once the CST is over for the year. Regular, district curriculum is still required and of course a balance of these things is in order throughout the year. Having said that, as academic instruction continues it can be a good idea to something like a field trip to the public library. This is a great way to get the kids a tour of “academia.” While most searching these days is done on the internet, the library remains an incredible resource the kids should know about. There are so many other things you can teach and do with your class after the CST.

Teaching kids music has a proven effect of increased academic performance. Get some Disney music or other choir based music and teach them to sing. You don’t have to be great at it yourself. Some of the old songs like “Davey Crockett” or “I’ve Been Working on the Railroad” have historical content that you can teach across the curriculum with history. If you have access to musical instruments, take some time to expose them to those. Art or course has value. One type I like to explore with my kids each year is “rip art.” The kids come up with truly talented work when we try it. As you work more art, music, sports, etc. (stuff outside of Language arts and Math) I think you will find ways to embed the academic standards into these areas. Life included academics but that is not all there is to life. Teach them about jobs and nutrition, all the while bringing in what you have taught them in the content standards. The Sky’s the limit. I think it’s a great idea to continue imparting eclectic knowledge after the standards test. It can even be helpful and inspiring to try subjects outside the daily grind of what we think of as CST preparation. In time, I hope teachers will be encouraged to teach and be tested more on topics outside of standardized testing. Now for your input: What do you teach after the test?